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  • What are your top inspection tips?

  • General Q&A, Bee chat and only Bee chat please
General Q&A, Bee chat and only Bee chat please
 #2801  by Bracecomb
 22 Apr 2019, 20:14
Always read last weeks records before setting off to apiary, this gives you a chance to get frames or supers that you have recorded and are needed for this week.
 #2846  by Chrisbarlow
 28 Apr 2019, 21:35
It's handy to have a spare nuc or two available when inspecting, if you find queens cells when inspecting you can harvest spare ones and make up one or more nucs and give you a better chance if having spare queens available.

Or you can move your queen into the nuc and leave just one cell in the original hive.
 #2848  by Caroline
 28 Apr 2019, 23:31
As well as a nuc box for storing frames or a queen during inspection, I also have a folding hive stand that I take to each apiary visit; place the upturned roof on this and supers removed from the hive can be placed on top without having to bend down so far as if the roof was directly on the ground. Also, it makes a good seat whilst writing your hive records between hives, or just taking a break.

You should have a reason for opening a hive and a plan of what you intend to do during the inspection; and then a back-up plan when you find something unexpected!
 #3011  by Chrisbarlow
 10 May 2019, 19:42
Not necessarily an inspection tip but a beekeeping tip. Try and have a couple of apiary sites even if you've only a small amount of colonies. It's can be quite handy to see the difference in yields at various sites at different times of year and how colonies can overwinter better in one place over others even when both sites are close together. It's also a great insurance if you happen to lose an apiary site at short notice.
 #3133  by Alfred
 17 May 2019, 14:26
Newly discovered gems for me:

Keep car windows shut.
While you have stewardship of an evil hive, plan an escape route and keep it well clear!!
Oversized long sleeve shirt under the suit.
Antihistamine tablets and witch hazel in the toolbox.
Queen-breeders phone number on speed dial.....
 #3136  by mikemadf
 17 May 2019, 15:20
MickBBKA wrote:
20 Apr 2019, 03:14
I broke the middle finger on my left hand and cut the tendons in my thumb also on my left hand many years ago, job related. I have limited movement of both and find it very hard to hold a queen as ' the books ' suggest, this is also the reason I don't do 14X12 as its hard to hold such a large frame, they would probably suit my colonies better but I have to use brood & half. So I have to trap the queen between thumb and forefinger on the comb, hold and clip. I use a crown of thorns to mark her as well as using it to stab my backside through my pocket.

My tip is, never put COT in your arse pocket ;-)
My COT is embedded in a small rectangle of 25mm Celotex - or similar insulation board...Safe to put in any pocket then! :D :) ;) :mrgreen: :geek: :ugeek:
 #3140  by Patrick
 17 May 2019, 16:38
Alfred wrote:
17 May 2019, 14:26
Newly discovered gems for me:

Keep car windows shut.
While you have stewardship of an evil hive, plan an escape route and keep it well clear!!
Oversized long sleeve shirt under the suit.
Antihistamine tablets and witch hazel in the toolbox.
Queen-breeders phone number on speed dial.....
There are times, such as when a colony is known to be queenless or big colonies after hot weather turns overcast and cold and they are all confined to barracks when it is prudent to remember the inspection tips of that noted beekeeper Kenny Rogers viz:

1. You’ve got to know when to hold them

2. Know when to fold them

3. Know when to walk away

4. And know when to run.

:D
 #3163  by Alfred
 18 May 2019, 19:03
Patrick wrote:
17 May 2019, 16:38
There are times, such as when a colony is known to be queenless or big colonies after hot weather turns overcast and cold and they are all confined to barracks when it is prudent to remember the inspection tips of that noted beekeeper Kenny Rogers viz:

1. You’ve got to know when to hold them

2. Know when to fold them

3. Know when to walk away

4. And know when to run.



:lol: :lol:
 #3214  by Patrick
 22 May 2019, 08:25
For various reasons some colonies put their brood nest more towards on or other end of the brood box. This often leads to them preferentially filling the super combs above the nest and leaving the other end combs either unfilled or uncapped.

You don’t have to go through them to know it, the supers feel heavier one side than the other. If they are quite heavy already, instead of adding more supers, simply put back on after inspection swung round 180 degrees. I tend to do this routinely at least once per colony before extraction as I don’t like dealing with part filled boxes.